Discerning Mission

The political novelty of God

I can't resist this quote from John Howard Yoder, which is cited in David Fitch's blog on mission and ecclesiology:

The political novelty that God brings into the world is a community of those who serve instead of ruling, who suffer instead of inflicting suffering, whose fellowship crosses social lines instead of reinforcing them. The new Christian community in which the walls are broken down not by human idealism or democratic legalism but by the work of Christ is not only a vehicle of the gospel

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'Liberating Lutheran Theology' by Paul Chung just released

Dr. Paul Chung has just co-authored a book on Lutheran theology in the public sphere: Liberating Lutheran Theology. Here's a brief description:

Lutheran theology of freedom at the center of grace of justification may become an arbiter for contextualizing God's grace and human discipleship in the public sphere.

This volume includes three different Lutheran perspectives as represented by European Lutheran theology (Ulrich Duchrow), American Lutheran theology (Craig L. Nessan), and Asian Lutheran theology

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How To Start a Church Without Money

Humble Walk mission developer, Rev. Jodi Houge, reflects on the benefits of being broke.

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Good question: what's the difference between worshiping together and worshiping at the same time?

From time to time we plan to post a "good question" at this blog, and deliberately invite responses. (We're overjoyed, of course, whenever anyone responds to any post here.)

This time I thought we could ask the same question Jodi-Renee Adams is asking in her very thoughtful blog essay on worship and spiritual formation. Amongst other questions she asks "what's the difference between worship together and worship at the same time?" Her essay offers a very thoughtful reflection on ecclesiology.

What

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T is for teaching the Bible

The Lutheran University Press has just published the lectures from last year's Hein-Fry series, and that series included one from Mary Hess entitled Learning  the Bible in the 21st Century: Lessons from Harry Potter and Vampires. Here's an excerpt:

"To argue that the Bible creates community, is to make a claim which sharply contradicts some learners’ reality. There is a natural tendency for learners to want to draw back in one of two ways in engaging such contradiction. 

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